A Monmouth County correctional officer has admitted to smuggling drugs into jail, hidden in bags of potato chips, Monmouth County Prosecutor Raymond Santiago announced on Wednesday.

Bryant Mack, 54, of Shamong, pleaded guilty on Friday in Monmouth County Superior Court to second-degree conspiracy to distribute a controlled dangerous substance.

In September 2021, officers caught two inmates with drugs and other contraband in their cells, which were traced back to Mack.

During his plea, Mack admitted that he agreed to supply drugs to inmates in exchange for money.

Monmouth County Superior Court Judge Jill O’Malley also ordered that Mack resign.

He faces up to five years in prison when sentenced in April 2023.

Santiago said that Mack’s “conduct is not indicative of the honest, hard-working, law enforcement officers who risk their lives daily to protect and serve our county.”

“An officer who violates his or her oath of office does a grave disservice to their co-workers, as well as the entire law enforcement profession, and will be held fully accountable with proper disciplinary action taken,” Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden said in the same release.

Erin Vogt is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach her at erin.vogt@townsquaremedia.com

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